4 Ways to Take Homeschooling Seriously and Stay Focused

Taking homeschooling seriously

If you’ve been homeschooling for a while you’ll know how frustrating it is not to be taken seriously.

You’re just getting somewhere with your child’s math lesson and someone knocks on the door, or your phone rings – and your child’s concentration flies out the window!

Often, people think that because you’re at home, you are available, and so they ask you to do all sorts of things because, well, you’re free, right?

Not only do others fail to take what you’re doing seriously, sometimes you don’t either. You show up in ragged jeans and a T-shirt, with an attitude to match, and wonder why your kids aren’t taking you seriously.

Something’s gotta change!

How can you start taking yourself seriously and get others to as well?

Treat your homeschool like a business

Homeschooling is your business and therefore deserves your time, attention, and focus. Change your mind-set about what you’re doing.

Determine your “office” hours and don’t take phone calls or answer messages unless it’s an emergency. Let your family and friends know what times you are available.

When you take what you do seriously, it’s likely that everyone else will too.

It’s OK to have healthy boundaries around your homeschool. It will create more structure, less frustration, and a better attitude in yourself and your kids.

Stay focused

It’s so easy to scroll through social media while you wait for your child to finish reading. But if you’re doing that, you have a split focus – which means that neither activity is getting your dedicated attention.

Stay off social media during your “office” hours.

Don’t multitask (haha, easier said than done, right?) – unless it’s something like mending that doesn’t require too much concentration and can be easily interrupted. Your focus should be on your kids’ learning.  

I was terrible at trying to multi-task while my kids were doing school and I stressed myself out a lot trying to juggle too many things at once.

If you want to be taken seriously, then, as James Clear says in his book Atomic Habits,

“Give each phase your full attention”.

Get comfortable saying ‘no’

People often think that because you are at home, you are available. They don’t realise that homeschooling your kids is a full time job and the more commitments you have outside the home means less time for your first work – homeschooling your kids.

It’s time to get comfortable saying no to:

  • Church commitments that tax your energy and mind space
  • Outings that don’t serve your homeschooling goals
  • Social activities that don’t meet your family’s social needs
  • Phone calls that chew up valuable time

Once you make sure you have time for the most important things in your family schedule, you can add other activities and commitments.

Dress the part

The psychology of dressing well is a two part process. It first affects you and how you feel about yourself and what you are doing.

Studies show that the clothes you wear affect your behaviour, attitude, mood, and confidence. Dressing well will boost your own attitude and make you feel like what you are doing is valuable.

If you look better, you’ll feel better, and project that onto everyone around you.

The clothes you wear will also affect how your kids hear what you are saying.

If you pitch up for homeschool in your pyjamas they’re probably not going to take you seriously. You are what your kids see. And somehow dressing well ups the value of what you are doing. It also increases respect for you.

Don’t underestimate this simple trick!

If you take homeschooling seriously, so will everyone else. It lies in your power to change things.

What do you do to help yourself, your kids, and others take homeschool more seriously?

About The Author

Jennifer Lovemore

Jennifer homeschooled all three of her kids-with no teaching qualification. Her kids are grown now but she is still passionate about homeschooling. She lives in South Africa.

Leave A Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.